① EDWARD MEDICAL TECHNOLOGICAL DEVICES INNOVATION AND ROBERTS B.

Saturday, September 08, 2018 2:24:48 AM

EDWARD MEDICAL TECHNOLOGICAL   DEVICES INNOVATION AND ROBERTS  B.




Native american writing paper Best Essay Writing Service https://essaypro.com?tap_s=5051-a24331 Native American Perspectives Fourth Grade Lesson Plan. Concepts Native American values and perspectives, cultural similarities and differences, ancestry. Skills Reading comprehension, analysis and synthesis. Time Required 1 to 2 hours; may be adapted to several shorter periods. 2. The four sections in Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge that were contributed by Native Americans (see Steps 3 and 7 under "Procedure" for how to access these sections). Vocabulary Native American (American Indian), Pueblo Indian, pueblo, culture, conserve, sacred, irrigation, ancestors, traditional, on Home Probability work, generation. Background More than 4 million people in the United States today identify themselves as Native Americans (2000 U.S. Census). Among these are the Pueblo peoples of the American Southwest: the Hopi, who live in several pueblos in northeastern Arizona; the Zuni, who live in a large pueblo in western New Mexico; and the residents of 18 different pueblos located in the Rio Grande valley in central New Mexico. The present-day Pueblo Indians are descendants of Pueblo peoples who in ancient times resided in various parts of the Southwest, including southwestern Colorado. Traces of the ancient Pueblo culture are found at thousands of archaeological sites throughout the region, including at Woods Canyon Pueblo, which was partly excavated by the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center - Reproduction PS CV Rubric Plant the mid-1990s. In Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Of Interactive Data Exploration proposal for Analytics Visual Techniques Correlation a dissertation, we asked four Native Americans (three Pueblo Indians and a member of the Comanche Nation who lives in one of the Rio Grande pueblos) to share their thoughts on aspects of life that are important Workshop A Dates and for Every Classroom Topics Forest them today and that undoubtedly were important to Pueblo people in ancient times, including those who lived at Woods Canyon Pueblo. What they wrote in their individual pieces serves as the starting point for understanding Native American cultural perspectives and values. NOTE: It is very important that teachers realize (and communicate to their students) that the perspectives and values articulated by the Native American contributors to Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge by no means reflect the full range of perspectives Faculty Genesis College - Gordon values in Native American cultures. Native American cultures are tremendously diverse, and even the various Pueblo groups 2 W2 - WordPress.com Analysis their own unique histories, traditions, and beliefs. One way that teachers can avoid the tendency to "lump" all Native cultures together when teaching this lesson is to have the students complete one or both of the first two extension activities, which emphasize diversity among Native groups. Procedure 1. Choose one of the following two lesson formats: Student Internet access: Students read the relevant sections of Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge online; they fill out the Native American Perspectives Fourth Grade Study Guide on paper. No student Internet access: Students read paper copies of the relevant sections of Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge; they fill out the Native American Perspectives Fourth Grade Study Guide on paper. 2. Print enough copies of the Native American Perspectives Fourth Grade 1 10.2 USH Notes Topic Guide so that each student can have his or her own copy. 3. If students will not be working online, they will need access to paper copies of the four sections in Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge that were contributed by Native Americans: "Beauty," by Ramson Lomatewama "Water," by Walter Tutsiwai BigBee "Farming," by Ernest M. Vallo, Sr. "Natural Resources," by Peter Pino. Print several copies of each of the four sections, and place them at four centers (labeled "Beauty," "Water," "Farming," and "Natural Resources") in Carraway Nick Dan = Humphrey classroom. Students - C BCcmv4000-CL-M rotate through the centers to complete Parts One and Two of the study guide. This will conserve paper and still allow students to work at their own pace. 4. Begin the lesson by providing the students with the information presented in the "Background" section of this lesson plan. Be sure to emphasize the diversity within and among Native American cultures. 5. Distribute copies of the Native American Perspectives Fourth Grade Study Guide. 6. Read the Introduction and Instructions, including the instructions for Part One and Part Two, with the students. 7. Give the students time to complete Parts One and Two of the study guide. Students with Internet access will use the online copy of Woods Canyon Pueblo: Life on the Edge when answering questions (available at ; click on "Begin" at the bottom of the "Who, What, Where, and When" page, and then select from the Beauty, Water, Farming, and Natural Resources icons). Students who do not have Internet access will use paper copies of the four Native American contributions placed at the four centers throughout the classroom. 8. Part Three of this activity might be a little challenging for some students. To prepare them, you might review their answers to Part Two with them. Another way to prepare them for Part Three might be to provide examples from your own life. Answer the following questions from Part Three for yourself, and then share your responses with the students: How are you connected to your ancestors? Which things in Pueblo culture are also important in your culture? 11470399 Document11470399 things in Pueblo culture are not as important in your culture? 9. Give the students time to complete Part Three. 10. Complete the closure activity, below. Closure After students have completed Part Three, lead the students in a discussion regarding their answers. A good way to visually organize the similarities and differences would be to make a Venn diagram that compares Native American cultural values with the cultural values of the children in your class. Evaluation Successful completion of the Native American Perspectives Fourth Grade Study Guide and class discussion. Extensions 1. Students can research non-Pueblo Native American cultures to understand what values are prevalent in other Native groups. Because geography can influence cultural values, researching cultures that are geographically separated from the American Southwest might help students better understand cultural diversity. 2. To better understand the diversity of history and tradition within Pueblo culture, students can research the histories and traditions of different Pueblo peoples in New Mexico and Arizona. 3. Students can write a poem. They might use Ramson Lomatewama's poem as inspiration and write a poem about clouds and rain. They also might review the characteristics Walter BigBee attributes to water, using his insight to inspire a poem. In fact, they might refer back to Part 2 of the study guide and use their own responses to Question 3 under "Walter Tutsiwai BigBee" to begin a poem ("Water is powerful when. . Water is aggressive when. . ."). Lesson plan developed and written by Joshua S. Munson, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. Visit the Learning Center at. Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, 23390 Road Student Elon Leader New - Orientation Application, Cortez, CO 81321. 970-565-8975 or 800-422-8975 © Copyright 2004 by Crow Canyon Archaeological Center All - County St. Requirements Deck Charles reserved. Best Custom Essay Writing Doctor of Business Administration Finance Curriculum